Coronavirus

The Coronavirus’ Dramatic Effect on Interior Design

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It might seem a little presumptuous to compile a “what to look for in 2021 interior design” piece, as 2020 itself is barely half over. But what a half-year it’s been. Spending months in quarantine has already dramatically impacted design, with new trends that will undoubtedly continue to resonate well into 2021 and beyond.

One of the foremost decorative themes that burbled away in the first half of the year and is almost guaranteed to explode in the near future, is the art of bringing the outdoors inside. Nature-starved homeowners have been craving what they’ve been denied of late, so expect to see an increased number of plants and lush indoor gardens, earth-toned color schemes, outdoor-style interior flooring, and even the occasional attached greenhouse.

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For the bigger picture, all this additional warmth and texture will also affect furniture choices

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Coronavirus, spreading in Brazil’s interior, threatens to ‘boomerang’ back to major cities

By Pedro Fonseca

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – The novel coronavirus, now spreading through the smaller towns of Brazil’s interior, risks returning to major cities in a so-called “boomerang effect,” as a lack of specialized medical treatment forces patients into larger urban centers.

The impact of a potential second wave of new cases in urban centers could complicate attempts to reopen businesses and get the economy going again, experts said.

“The boomerang of cases that will return to the (state) capitals will be a tsunami,” said Miguel Nicolelis, a leading medical neuroscientist at Duke University who is coordinating a coronavirus task force advising the state governments of Brazil’s northeast.

Brazil, home to the world’s second worst coronavirus outbreak behind the United States, has over 1.2 million cases of the virus, which has killed nearly 55,000 people. On most days, it is spreading faster in Brazil than in the United States,

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Coronavirus: latest global developments

Here are the latest developments in the coronavirus crisis.

– At least 292,000 dead –

At least 292,000 coronavirus deaths have been recorded since the epidemic surfaced in China late last year, according to an AFP tally at 1300 GMT on Wednesday based on official sources.

There have been more than 4,272,880 officially recorded cases around the world.

The United States has recorded most deaths at 82,389. It is followed by Britain (33,186), Italy (30,911), Spain (27,104) and France (26,991).

Lesotho, the last African country to have been unaffected, announces it has detected its first case.

– Europe’s summer holidays –

Desperate to save millions of tourism jobs, the European Union sets out plans for a phased restart of travel this summer, with EU border controls eventually lifted and measures to minimise the risks of infection, like wearing facemasks on shared transport.

– Russia: more than 10,000 new cases –

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Arts center in Gold Rush town opens, but coronavirus forces closure two days later. What now?

Interior view of the $6.3-million Center for the Arts in Grass Valley. Before the center's multimillion-dollar renovation, the nearest arts venue was a 60-mile drive to Sacramento. <span class="copyright">(Melissa Clark)</span>
Interior view of the $6.3-million Center for the Arts in Grass Valley. Before the center’s multimillion-dollar renovation, the nearest arts venue was a 60-mile drive to Sacramento. (Melissa Clark)

In tiny, ravaged Grass Valley, best known as the site of the historic Empire gold mine, the last two years were marked by wildfires that left the town scarred, and dotted by blackouts that closed businesses for 22 days.

Locals worried for the future. But the Gold Rush community had started to feel hopeful while preparing for the planned March 12 soft opening of the town’s $6.3-million Center for the Arts, housed in an Art Deco complex complete with a modern art gallery, theater, commercial kitchen and a 492-seat auditorium.

Culture boosters had booked Arlo Guthrie and Amy Grant as part of the first season, and were working to uplift residents in the devastated area outside Sacramento, after so many

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