Design

Bird Streets aerie offers a showcase of design

Built for interior designer Ron Collier, this modern perch in the Hollywood Hills’ Bird Streets was later owned by celebrated art patron Merry Norris, who commissioned Barbara Barry to style the interior during her ownership.

Among Berry’s first design projects in Los Angeles, the residence is museum-like with its gallery walls, high ceilings and sun-drenched rooms. Pocketing doors in the living and dining rooms open directly to a pool deck. Westward views extending as far as the ocean can be observed from the second story, particularly in the master suite and its sitting room.

The details

Location: 1473 Oriole Drive, Los Angeles, 90069

Asking price: $5.995 million

Year built: 1982

Architect: Gus Duffy

Living area: 4,501 square feet, three bedrooms, four bathrooms

Lot size: 7,449 square feet

Features: Gallery walls; high ceilings; skylights; hardwood floors; pocketing doors; formal living and dining rooms; office; master suite with sitting room; office/artist’s

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Virtual Design Services – Modsy Online Design During a Pandemic

For many people, home improvement and redesign projects were halted when shelter-in-place orders went into effect as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. With contractors and interior designers no longer allowed to set foot physically in their clients’ spaces, executing the dreamed-of design visions has been difficult at best. So it’s only natural if you’re among those who want to turn to an online design company that offers completely virtual—i.e., no personal contact—design services, providing clients with the tools they need to keep their redesigns rolling during this new era of social distancing. ELLE Decor recently spoke with Alessandra Wood, the vice president of style at the virtual design firm Modsy, to hear more about its online design process and what trends she has seen developing over the course of the past two months.

ELLE Decor: Can you give us a rundown of how Modsy operates?

Alessandra Wood: Modsy

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How The Quarantine Will Change Home Design

Not in recent memory have so many Americans carried out nearly every aspect of our lives—working, schooling, resting, playing, eating—at home. Spending so much time at home has meant we’ve had to rethink the way we use certain spaces, from setting up workspaces inside and out to popping up virtual happy hours from our living room sofas.

While many of these quick-fix design solutions are likely (and hopefully) temporary, there’s no doubt all of this time at home will change what we need from our homes—and thus how we want them designed—for the foreseeable future. One home design concept that may prove less desirable going forward: the open floor plan.

Used to describe homes in which two or more traditional-use rooms (like the kitchen, living room, and dining room) are combined to form a much larger space by eliminating walls that would have divided them, open floor plans have

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